Today, Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe declared a state of emergency in Charlottesville, Va., a small college town that has been the focal point of “Unite the Right” rallies stemming from the town’s decision last April to sell the statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee.

The rally, which was organized by AltRight.com Richard Spencer, is the third rally organized in Charlottesville since the town’s decision to sell the statue. After a state of emergency was declared, violence erupted. A car struck a crowd of people, killing one and injuring 19 others. Two more people have died in a helicopter crash that is also tied to the rally.

Spencer is a well-known white supremacist (or, as he calls it, white nationalist). He has advocated for a “peaceful ethnic cleansing,” claimed the media was critical of President Donald Trump during the election campaign to protect Jewish interests and is the president of the National Policy Institute, a think-tank self-described as “an independent organization dedicated to the heritage, identity, and future of  people of European descent in the United States, and around the world.”

The “Unite the Right” rallies were filled with white supremacy undertones, including people carrying Nazi flags. Last month, the Ku Klux Klan rallied in Charlottesville.

Despite this, Trump has failed to condemn Spencer or the white nationalists, pushing the blame on “many sides.” Despite having many chances to condemn this group, and other white supremacy groups, Trump has again failed to do so.

In February 2016, Trump fumbled an opportunity to rebuke the endorsement of for Ku Klux Klan grand wizard David Duke until days after his comments caused controversy, which he blamed on a bad earpiece. Despite overwhelming evidence of Spencer and the white nationalist’s ideologies, he is yet to rebuke him either.

His refusal to call the white nationalists by what they are bears a resemblance to former president Barack Obama’s refusal to call ISIS by name, something Trump routinely criticized Obama for and has mentioned them by name on several occasions.

Denouncing the white nationalists should be a slam dunk and one of the easier decisions of Trump’s presidency, but as usual, nothing comes easy for Trump. Perhaps he fears the loss of what little support he has by condemning them, but how desperate must you be to want support from groups that endorse white supremacy?

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